Welcome To Our Classrooms

The Infant Room

The Toddler Room

The Preschool 1 Room

The Preschool 2 Room

The Preschool 3 Room

The Creative Curriculum

The most important goal of our early childhood curriculum is to help children become enthusiastic learners. This means encouraging children to be active and creative explorers who are not afraid to try out their ideas and to think their own thoughts. Our goal is to help children become independent, self-confident, inquisitive learners. We're teaching them how to learn, not just in preschool, but all through their lives. We're allowing them to learn at their own pace and in the ways that are best for them. We're giving those good habits and attitudes, particularly a positive sense of themselves, which will make a difference throughout their lives.

Our curriculum identifies goals in all areas of development:

Social: To help children feel comfortable in school, trust their new environment, make friends, and feel they are a part of the group.

Emotional: To help children experience pride and self- confidence, develop independence and self-control, and have a positive attitude toward life.

Cognitive: To help children become confident learners by letting them try out their own ideas and experience success, and by helping them acquire learning skills such as the ability to solve problems, ask questions, and use words to describe their ideas, observations, and feelings.

Physical: To help children increase their large and small muscle skills and feel confident about what their bodies can do.


The activities we plan for children, the way we organize the environment, select toys and materials, plan the daily schedule, and talk with children, are all designed to accomplish the goals of our curriculum and give your child a successful start in school.



Get Set for School

Get Set for School materials accommodate both teacher-directed and student-initiated playful learning, because we know that sparking the imagination leads to a lifelong love of learning. Basic readiness skills should be taught systematically. It’s not up to children to decide how to read, write, and count. We teach them the way we read and write from top to bottom and left to right. We teach them how to hold a crayon and how to write letters. We teach them key skills to advance their competency and success - so they develop the skills to be independent as they enter school. The materials provide flexibility for the teacher and offer activities in a developmental sequence. Ensuring mastery of one skill before introducing another builds the competence and confidence children need for independent problem solving. The materials also encourage family involvement to continue learning activities at home. Many activities have take-home components to encourage children to form connections between learning in school and home situations.

The Reading and writing program incorporates child-friendly teaching strategies, such as using music and movement to bring lessons to life, and multisensory manipulatives to build fine and gross motor skills. Our readiness and writing lessons teach body awareness, cooperation, taking turns, listening, crayon grip, drawing, building, letter and number recognition, capital letter and number formation.

The language and literacy program actively teaches syllables, names and sounds of letters, words linked to content, new words in spoken language, how to respond to simple questions, and how to have discussions and share ideas. The program focuses on building rich Vocabulary so that children learn a word’s meaning and what a word represents so they begin to understand the network of concepts that goes with it. Children also learn the difference between drawing and writing, associate books with reading, ‘read’ environmental print, and ultimately learn the many benefits of early reading and writing. Children also learn to identify letter symbols, both capital and lowercase, by letter names. They learn how these “symbols” work together to form printed words and how printed words relate to spoken language.

The numbers and math program teaches counting, comparisons, spatial awareness, patterning, sequencing, matching, sorting, problem solving, and even Pre-K geometry skills. The program helps students build number sense right from the start. They also get time to play with real objects and test their ideas so that math becomes real and meaningful. Children also develop oral language that helps them learn about and express math concepts.